Report | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center

Renewables on the Rise

Clean energy is sweeping across America, and is poised for further dramatic growth in the years ahead.

Report | Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center

Lead in Bergen County School Drinking Water Analysis

In Bergen County, the state's most populous county which includes more than 70 school districts, Environment New Jersey was able to compile complete testing results from more than 3,300 drinking water outlets from 47 districts. The results, which are required to be accessible to the public, showed that 55% of the drinking water outlets in these schools showed some level of lead contamination.

Report | Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center

Our Health at Risk

Despite decades of progress under the Clean Air Act, Americans across the country continue to breathe unhealthy air, leading to increased risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

Report | Environment New Jersey Research and Policy Center

Shining Cities 2017

Solar power grew at a record-breaking pace in 2016. The United States now has 42 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy capacity, enough to power 8.3 million homes and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 52.3 million metric tons annually.1 Hundreds of thousands of Americans, especially in our cities, have invested in their own solar panels or solar projects in their communities and millions more are ready to join them.

Report | Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center

Get the Lead Out: Ensuring Safe Drinking Water For Our Children in School

Lead is highly toxic and especially damaging to children -- impairing their learning and development, lowering their intelligence and altering their behavior. Right now, regulations are too weak to protect our children from lead-laden water at school, testing is too haphazard and non-transparent, and remediation is left to chance. Because lead is so toxic, the most health-protective policy is to remove lead from our schools and pre-schools. States, including New Jersey, have been lagging in their response, and lead in our drinking water -- and in our childrens' blood -- should be treated like the crisis it is.

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